How is climate change destabilizing NC coastal ecology?

How is climate change destabilizing NC coastal ecology?


Carolina Public Press continues its celebration of 10 years of investigative and public interest journalism in North Carolina. In the sixth event in our free virtual Ten for NC series, CPP convened a panel of experts to discuss the effects of severe weather and rising temperatures on North Carolina’s coastal communities and its commercial and recreational fishing industries.

The “Changing Tides” series examines the changes to the state’s coastal ecology from the perspectives of scientists, regulators and people whose livelihoods depend on the seas, examining divided opinions, best practices and potential public policy and regulatory shifts that could improve outlooks. The series was funded in part through the Pulitzer Center.

This companion event featured a robust discussion of the issues of erratic weather’s effects on coastal communities and livelihoods as well as solutions to the problems that arise from climate change and man-made environmental damage.

See the video from the event below:

This panel included:

Ryan Bethea, an oyster farmer based on Harkers Island.

Leda Cunningham, based in Morehead City, leader of the Pew Charitable Trust’s work in North Carolina waters to protect and restore ocean resources and coastal habitats, including seagrass and oysters, and to ensure sustainable fishing policies.

Jack Igelman, based in Asheville, lead environmental reporter for Carolina Public Press, holds a master’s degree in natural resource economics from Montana State University.

Sara Mirabilio, a Fisheries Extension Specialist at North Carolina Sea Grant, whose work includes cooperative research with, and providing technical training to, North Carolina’s commercial, for-hire and recreational fishermen.

Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor at Rutgers University in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, a member of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, and an affiliate in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Queen Quet, Marquetta L. Goodwine, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation, a published author, computer scientist, lecturer, preservationist and environmental justice advocate, founder of the premiere advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition.

The Ten for NC series is designed to help readers go in-depth on issues and interests of North Carolinians.

Join us! More events coming up

Ten for NC events are free and feature panelists and speakers, along with opportunities for discussion with participants. However, space is limited, so tickets are required.

Discussions of North Carolina news deserts and ghost newspapers, how the reauthorization of the federal Violence Against Women Act will impact the state, and how Covid-19 has impacted small business, jobs, tourism and the state’s economy are topics covered in this series so far.

Visit the Ten for NC page for information on all the events, how to submit your questions to panelists and more about CPP’s 10th anniversary.

Become an event sponsor: Sponsorships are available for a single or multiple events. Email Development Director Lisa Lopez for information.

Subscribe to our newsletters to receive invitations and updates on future events.

Learn more about Carolina Public Press and its 10-year history in North Carolina. 

Watch a short video celebrating CPP’s anniversary. 



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